Global Educators Cohort Program - Teacher Education

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Anne-Lise Halvorsen - Assistant Professor, Social Studies Education

Teacher Education in the College of Educationat Michigan State University


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TE 401 Teaching Social Studies to Diverse Learners
This course is designed to complement undergraduate learning in TE 301. In TE 301, the focus was on developing teacher identity and about how children learn, about lesson planning, and about how classrooms are organized. TE 401 focuses primarily on introducing senior level preservice teachers to teaching and learning in social studies. The course posits that social studies education is about developing social understanding and
civic efficacy in students. Social understanding is knowledge of the social aspects of the human condition, the effects of physical environments
and cultural settings on people, and the trends likely to shape the future. Civic efficacy is the readiness and willingness of people to assume citizenship responsibility.


TE 810 History of U.S. Education
The principal aim of this online course is to give students an understanding of the origins and development of various issues and problems in contemporary U.S. public education. The course covers the history of U.S. public education from the colonial period to the present. Primarily, the course focuses on the common school era (1825-1850), the progressive education era (1890-1920), the Civil Rights era (1950-1970), and the modern era – often referred to as the era of academic excellence – (1980-to the present). Among the issues the course explores are religion, race, ethnicity, gender, social class, and language in schools; the role of education in developing American political and cultural identities; and the
relationship between economics and education. The course also examines major historical interpretations of U.S. education and discusses the
reasons behind those different interpretations in order to relate them to current issues. The unifying question posed throughout the course is:
Do schools change society, or does society change schools?

TE 902 Proseminar in Curriculum, Teaching, and Educational Policy
This is the second of two pro-seminar courses required of all entering students in the doctoral program in Curriculum, Teaching, and Educational Policy. The course is intended to help doctoral students to develop advanced skills in critical thinking, analytical writing, and thoughtful collegial discussion. It also provides an introduction to traditions of interpretation of research in teacher education. The course confronts fundamental issues
in education, especially as the these issues relate to teaching as a professional practice, learning to teach, and teacher learning. Finally, the course provides an overview of the central lines of research on teacher learning and teacher's work, as well as the research of COE faculty.


TE 934 Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Educational Research
This course is a hands-on introductory course in quantitative research methods, data analysis, and conceptualization that focuses on non-experimental methods. As such, the course emphasizes the application of statistical concepts to practical questions in social science, policy, and evaluation, while also including instruction in appropriate statistical theory. The course has two parts: a consumer-based component and a producer-based component. Doctoral students taking this course will learn to become a smart readers of quantitative studies and will also develop skills for doing quantitative data analysis.

TE 991 History of U.S. Education
TE 991 is an online course which gives doctoral students a deeper understanding of the origins and development of various issues and problems in contemporary U.S. public education. The course covers the history of U.S. public education from the colonial period to the present. Primarily, the course focuses on the common school era (1825-1850), the progressive education era (1890-1920), the Civil Rights era (1950-1970), and the modern era – often referred to as the era of academic excellence – (1980-to the present). The course has a special focus on the history of under-represented groups in the U.S. educational system. These groups include but are not limited to African-Americans, Native Americans, Latino Americans, Asian Americans, girls and women, immigrants. These groups comprise a crucial part of the story of how the U.S. educational system evolved, and yet, they are often left out of histories of mainstream schooling. Fortunately, several first-rate accounts of the experiences of these groups of individuals exist that we will draw upon in the course. Other minor foci will be the history of post-secondary education and the history of teacher education.